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  • edited August 12

    Nice article. I hadn't seen Fixing the old Folgezettel referred to in Bob Doto's post previously. Perhaps it's just as well, since my own "Folgezettel IDs" are dotted Luhmann-style IDs with appended timestamps. This is documented in my Zettel github wiki under ID Format, in case anyone is interested. My system relies on Zettlr, which uses Pandoc for document export to LaTeX. The LaTeX source and PDF export configurations are modified, as is the default LaTeX template (lightly). All of this is documented at the above wiki and has remained stable for months.

    Erdős #2. ZK software components. “If you’re thinking without writing, you only think you’re thinking.” -- Leslie Lamport. Replies delayed, sometimes indefinitely since Life is short.

  • @sfast Thanks for sharing that article! It was well written, not too long :wink: , and contained some intriguing ideas.

    I liked this question:

    The question, "Does folgezettel work?" must be superseded by one that asks how blind spots, getting lost, and the forgetting of ideas can be beneficial to our creativity.

  • edited August 12

    @GeoEng51 Good point and thank you for reminding me--I meant to comment more about Bob Doto's post. The philosopher Raymond Geuss touches on an aspect of this in the second paragraph below. The preceding paragraph is included for context. I added the boldface below.

    Many of us strive for clarity and we do this for many of the excellent reasons the philosophic tradition has expounded in great detail. We tend to attribute to others an equal striving for and attainment of clarity with respect to their own beliefs, although the apparent generosity of this impulse sometimes can be suspected to mask a certain slyness, because it warrants us to put words in others’ mouths, the better thereby to catch them out and trip them up. Socrates, of course, was an unsurpassed master of this technique, and his example remains in this regard paradigmatic for much of contemporary philosophy.

    However, as Nietzsche very powerfully pointed out, humans do not always exhibit maximal interest in clarity and explicitness, and they are right not to. Clarity is often of no use to us at all, and can in some circumstances be a positive hindrance to attaining various important human goods. In addition to our desire for clarity and definiteness, humans exhibit a second set of properties that are perhaps equally important, are very inadequately understood, are very little under our control, and are seriously underappreciated. These are the powers of forgetting, ignoring, failing to ask questions.
    -- Geuss, Raymond. Outside Ethics (p. 6). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

    Erdős #2. ZK software components. “If you’re thinking without writing, you only think you’re thinking.” -- Leslie Lamport. Replies delayed, sometimes indefinitely since Life is short.

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