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What RMS for a mix of academic papers, other pdfs and articles from the web?

Hi!

In my work as a journalist I use a lot of different kinds of sources. I read a fair share of academic papers, but also a lot of other pdf documents (published by magazines, government, businesses etc) and articles and blogposts on the web. So far, I've been using Devonthink to store local copies of everything I think I will need in the future.

What advantages would I get if I switch to a RMS like Zotero?

One big hurdle in my current workflow is how to extract highlights and annotations from the pdfs I read (preferably as markdown). Is that something Zotero (or any of the other more academic-tuned RMSs could help with)?

Are Zotero et al tailormade for academic papers that they wont fit my need for a RMS that also handles other pdfs and web archives?

/Anders

Comments

  • I wouldn't store any material besides texts that are so deep that you read them over and over again. The bible for a theologican, Nietzsche's Work for a philosopher or something similar would fall under that umbrella.

    I go thoroughly through any text and extract all what I can to notes and then the text will be deleted.

  • Zotero helps mostly with organizing and inserting metadata for academic references. It can also help in managing reading and annotations of PDFs. With the extension Zotfile you can send and retrieve PDFs to a dropbox location for easy access with an iPad for example and then keep track of changes. Zotero can then automatically extract annotations although you get them inside zotero and have to copy-paste to another location. Zotfile is also good for automatically moving and renaming PDFs to keep them linked to the Zotero database.

    There is this mac application called Highlights that promises to extract annotations directly to a nicely formatted Markdown file. That looks great and makes a Linux user envious :)

    http://highlightsapp.net/

  • @magnus said:

    Zotero helps mostly with organizing and inserting metadata for academic references. It can also help in managing reading and annotations of PDFs. With the extension Zotfile you can send and retrieve PDFs to a dropbox location for easy access with an iPad for example and then keep track of changes. Zotero can then automatically extract annotations although you get them inside zotero and have to copy-paste to another location. Zotfile is also good for automatically moving and renaming PDFs to keep them linked to the Zotero database.

    There is this mac application called Highlights that promises to extract annotations directly to a nicely formatted Markdown file. That looks great and makes a Linux user envious :)

    http://highlightsapp.net/

    Thanks for all the suggestions!

  • @sfast said:
    I go thoroughly through any text and extract all what I can to notes and then the text will be deleted.

    I might end up there eventually, but in the meantime I think I still want to store the original for easy access as well. :)

  • In that case, I would still delete it and if you need the text later on: Google it.

    But I don't think that is what you'd like. I think I would just put it in DevonThink or any other application that allows for full text search and then search it as I needed it. (For me this app would be google since I mostly would need science papers that are available via the wonder wold of the internet)

  • @sfast said:
    But I don't think that is what you'd like. I think I would just put it in DevonThink or any other application that allows for full text search and then search it as I needed it. (For me this app would be google since I mostly would need science papers that are available via the wonder wold of the internet)

    No, since scientific papers are only a small part of my research, I don’t trust my google-skills to find something again. Also, there is always the risk that what I’m looking for has been removed from the web.

  • That might be true for some sources, but DOI-backed PDFs should be very reliable to find again in science paper hubs, wink wink, even if the original goes down.

    Author at Zettelkasten.de • http://christiantietze.de/

  • @thoresson said:
    No, since scientific papers are only a small part of my research, I don’t trust my google-skills to find something again. Also, there is always the risk that what I’m looking for has been removed from the web.

    What are typical texts for you?

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