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  • @ctietze said:
    The bolt example reminds me of a sociological study that stuck with me: "Crime and Punishment in the Factory: The Function of Deviancy in Maintaining the Social System"

    https://onwork.edu.au/bibitem/1963-Bensman,Joseph-Gerver,Israel-Crime+and+Punishment+in+the+Factory+The+Function+of+Deviancy+in+Maintaining+the+Social+System/

    I bet you find copies of that to read. The crux is that even though drilling new threading into bolt holes is officially forbidden and punished, there's a rather complex informal agreement on when and how to re-thread holes, if needed.

    Hey-hey Christian :)

    That article is fascinating!

  • Okay, quick update: I'm about to enter the last leg of the jouney with Tinybase. Here's where I'm at...

    Builds for Windows, Linux, OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, Minix & a preliminary build for Mac (more testing needs to be done there).

    Additionally, Tinybase in both REPL & scripting modes now runs over a networked connection using any of SSH/Telnet/RSH & of course on a USB stick or plain old computer.

    All configuration is now outside of userspace & contained within an external file parsed at runtime as shown next:

    # tinybase color table
    
    # default 0   green  3   magenta 6
    # black   1   yellow 4   cyan    7
    # red     2   blue   5   white   8
    
    # tinybase profile settings
    
    BLOCK-COLOR    7  #  0 to 8 see color table
    HEADER-COLOR   5  #  0 to 8 see color table
    NUMBERS-COLOR  2  #  0 to 8 see color table
    PRECISION      2  #  0 to 8 decimal places
    CURSOR         2  #  0 default, 1 underline, 2 bar, 3 block
    ENCODING       0  #  0 none, 1 xor-byte, 2 caesar's revenge, 3 rot13
    SCAN-ENGINE    0  #  0 literal, 1 phonetic, 2 regex
    INDEX          2  #  0 unsorted, 1 sorted A-Z, 2 sorted by frequency
    LINE-NUMBERS   1  #  0 off, 1 on
    SHELL-ACCESS   1  #  0 off, 1 on
    
    # eof
    

    Conversely, if Tinybase needs to be ran in a more constrained or embedded environment, or even if you don't want a config file, one can instead simply edit the last 11 bytes of the Tinybase binary itself as shown below:

    a leading dash (-) means 'dont' read the following digits: -7500000011
    
    a leading plus (+) means 'do' read the following digits:   +7500000011
    

    Manual explains all the details. Also 3 encoding schemes using the following streaming ciphers:

    xor()
    
    caesars-revenge() (footnote below)
    
    rot13()
    

    Ever onwards!

    https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/2375/caesars-revenge

  • Re: I bet you find copies of that to read...

    Piecing it together bit by bit.

  • edited December 2022

    Hooray! Macros done.

    Given a tagged block with this content:


    tags: macro-test What is this? -> [M0] [M1] [M2] [M3] [M4] [M5] [M6] [M7] [M8] [M9]

    Tinybase expands defined macros 'in place' ([M8] & [M9] are not defined & thus rendered literally) within the affected block...

    The macros are defined in the user's config file & parsed when Tinybase initializes...

    A good day :)

  • Okay, a final tweak to the metrics.

    Decided to calculate a file's Flesch Score... This should be considered subjective & perhaps even archaic (see footnote), nevertheless its an interesting metric.

    /*
    
    readability...
    
    90-100  very easy
    80-90   easy
    70-80   fairly easy
    60-70   plain english
    50-60   fairly difficult
    30-50   difficult
     < 30   very difficult
    
    */
    

    Enough coding - I need to get back to work on the manual (does it ever end?)

    • In 1943, Rudolf Flesch published his PhD dissertation, Marks of a Readable Style, which included a readability formula to predict the difficulty of adult reading material.
  • If you use this score now, I'd also be interested in how you perceive its effects on your writing. Do you begin to edit notes later? Do you ignore it? Etc.

    Author at Zettelkasten.de • https://christiantietze.de/

  • Hi Christian. I'm not sure just yet. :) I'm still studying/learning/thinking. Some notes to share...


    tags: Flesch, readability, words, count, formula, code https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flesch%E2%80%93Kincaid_readability_tests https://www.webfx.com/tools/read-able/flesch-kincaid.html https://www.textcompare.org/readability/flesch-kincaid-grade-level In 1943, Rudolf Flesch published his PhD dissertation, Marks of a Readable Style, which included a readability formula to predict the difficulty of adult reading material. Flesch reading ease formula... r = 206.835 - 1.015 * (words / sentences) - 84.6 * (syllables / words) 90-100 very easy 80-90 easy 70-80 fairly easy 60-70 plain english 50-60 fairly difficult 30-50 difficult < 30 very difficult Flesch-Kincaid grade level formula (eg '3' = USA 3rd grade comprehension)... r = 0.39 * (words / sentences) + 11.8 * (syllables / words) - 15.59 5.0-5.9 5th grade very easy to read 6.0-6.9 6th grade easy to read 7.0-7.9 7th grade fairly easy to read 8.0-9.9 8th & 9th grade conversational english 10.0-12.9 10th, 11th & 12th grade fairly difficult to read 13.0-15.9 college difficult to read 16.0-17.9 college graduate very difficult to read 18.0+ professional extremely difficult to read Notes... Reader's Digest magazine has a readability index of about 65, Time magazine scores about 52, an average grade six student's written assignment (age of 12) has a readability index of 60–70 (and a reading grade level of six to seven), and the Harvard Law Review has a general readability score in the low 30s. The highest (easiest) readability score possible is 121.22, but only if every sentence consists of only one one-syllable word. "The cat sat on the mat." scores 116. The score does not have a theoretical lower bound; therefore, it is possible to make the score as low as wanted by arbitrarily including words with many syllables. The sentence "This sentence, taken as a reading passage unto itself, is being used to prove a point." has a readability of 69. The sentence "The Australian platypus is seemingly a hybrid of a mammal and reptilian creature." scores 37.5 as it has 24 syllables and 13 words. While Amazon calculates the text of Moby-Dick as 57.9, one particularly long sentence about sharks in chapter 64 has a readability score of -146.77. One sentence in the beginning of Swann's Way, by Marcel Proust, has a score of -515.1. The U.S. Department of Defense uses the reading ease test as the standard test of readability for its documents and forms. Florida requires that insurance policies have a Flesch reading ease score of 45 or greater. Use of this scale is so ubiquitous that it is bundled with popular word processing programs and services such as KWord, IBM Lotus Symphony, Microsoft Office Word, WordPerfect, WordPro, and Grammarly.
  • edited December 2022

    @ctietze said: If you use this score now, I'd also be interested in how you perceive its effects on your writing. Do you begin to edit notes later? Do you ignore it? Etc.

    You know, yes, I think I will use these Christian. At least tentatively. Very interesting metrics on the whole. Besides Flesch, I've also added: ARI, Lix, & Coleman-Liau.

    Here's the metrics output from the puzzle data you've seen before upthread, as well as another data file that simply contains some quick notes. The results are striking imo...

    Just whistle if you want to peek at the formulas.

    metrics...
    
    file      puzzles.txt
    size      24.9KB
    modified  2022.12.06-15:04:00
    crc8      0xb8
    lines     857
    blocks    50 [ignored: 0]
    tags      151 [per block avg: 3.02]
    
    ari score...
    
    characters   14,671
    words        9,926
    sentences    5
    readability  professor [ages 24+]
    
    lix score...
    
    words        9,926
    long words   342
    sentences    5
    readability  99.50 [very difficult]
    
    flesch-kincaid score...
    
    syllables    4,544
    words        9,926
    sentences    5
    readability  30.00 [very difficult]
    
    coleman-liau score...
    
    letters      14,514
    words        9,926
    sentences    5
    readability  -7.00 [unreadable...]
    
    -- end output ----------------------------------------------------------------
    
    metrics...
    
    file      papers.txt
    size      140.3KB
    modified  2022.12.08-20:10:31
    crc8      0xcf
    lines     4,517
    blocks    38 [ignored: 0]
    tags      92 [per block avg: 2.42]
    
    ari score...
    
    characters   83,691
    words        20,196
    sentences    1,752
    readability  3rd grade [ages 7-9]
    
    lix score...
    
    words        20,196
    long words   3,795
    sentences    1,752
    readability  30.32 [easy]
    
    flesch-kincaid score...
    
    syllables    26,207
    words        20,196
    sentences    1,752
    readability  85.00 [easy]
    
    coleman-liau score...
    
    letters      77,240
    words        20,196
    sentences    1,752
    readability  4.00 [5th grade & below]
    
    
  • edited December 2022

    For a number of years, I've been 'plotting' my notes with a graphics app & thought after adding to this thread: Why not build my own charts in plain text?

    Had to right justify the index of tag names on the left, & yet, left justify the bargraph on the right (that's a mouthful) so the rows below align with the rows above.

    Still, works pretty well really...

  • Ok, crude tree in place. I can map parent to child relationships & sibling to sibling relationships, a type of node vector, witness...

    But more distant affinities (sorry I'm grappling with the terminology as I'm self-taught) such as a relation/correlation between say, block 1 tag 'code' & block 82 tag 'code', I'm still brooding over. Hope I can nail this. Must continue to mull this over more.

    Never say die...

  • edited December 2022
  • Chuckle I knew you were going to say that! And yes, the 7bit tree is butt-ugly. B) Thanks or the links Christian, I very much appreciate it, confirms I'm on the right track.

    Wound up using ANSI/Hex encoding. Snippet below for those interested in these things.

    /*
    tags: code, box, ansi, c, sh
    
    hex encoded ansi box characters for c...
    
      usage: printf("%s\n", VL);
    
      #define RC "\e(0\x75\e(B" // 185 right cross
      #define VL "\e(0\x78\e(B" // 186 vertical line
      #define RB "\e(0\x6a\e(B" // 188 right bottom corner
      #define RT "\e(0\x6b\e(B" // 187 right top corner
      #define LB "\e(0\x6d\e(B" // 200 left bottom corner
      #define LT "\e(0\x6c\e(B" // 201 left top cornet
      #define BC "\e(0\x76\e(B" // 202 bottom cross
      #define TC "\e(0\x77\e(B" // 203 top cross
      #define LC "\e(0\x74\e(B" // 204 left cross
      #define HL "\e(0\x71\e(B" // 205 horizontal line
      #define MC "\e(0\x6e\e(B" // 206 middle cross
    
    hex encoded ansi box characters for shell scripts...
    
      usage: echo -e $VL
    
      RC="\e(0\x75\e(B" # 185 right cross
      VL="\e(0\x78\e(B" # 186 vertical line
      RB="\e(0\x6a\e(B" # 188 right bottom corner
      RT="\e(0\x6b\e(B" # 187 right top corner
      LB="\e(0\x6d\e(B" # 200 left bottom corner
      LT="\e(0\x6c\e(B" # 201 left top cornet
      BC="\e(0\x76\e(B" # 202 bottom cross
      TC="\e(0\x77\e(B" # 203 top cross
      LC="\e(0\x74\e(B" # 204 left cross
      HL="\e(0\x71\e(B" # 205 horizontal line
      MC="\e(0\x6e\e(B" # 206 middle cross
    */
    
  • edited December 2022

    I'm left gob-smacked looking at some of the metrics tinybase is producing. By percentage I've always assumed the largest amount of tags in any of my data files were labeled 'code' & while that is certainly true, it doesn't tell the whole story. Now with the 'node' (tree) view, new patterns are surfacing I was not previously cognizant of, chiefly orphaned tags (not sure, but I believe Will coined that term). And 'work-horse' nodes (tagged blocks with a multiplicity of aliases)...

    Really amazing to be able to quantify one's data in differing contexts. Almost like having fresh eyes. Well, back to work, defining the grammar I'm using in the app's manual. Exciting times for me :)

    Post edited by Mike_Sanders on
  • Happy to see the way more sexy characters being used :)

    I'm left gob-smacked looking at some of the metrics tinybase is producing. By percentage I've always assumed the largest amount of tags in any of my data files were labeled 'code' & while that is certainly true, it doesn't tell the whole story. Now with the 'node' (tree) view, new patterns are surfacing I was not previously cognizant of, chiefly orphaned tags (not sure, but I believe Will coined that term). And 'work-horse' nodes (tagged blocks with a multiplicity of aliases)...

    Can you explain what we're looking at in the picture some more? E.g. I've scanned the screenshot for 'code', but didn't find it anywhere, so I'm not sure how "the largest amount of tags [...] were labeled 'code'" and "new patterns are surfacing"

    Author at Zettelkasten.de • https://christiantietze.de/

  • edited December 2022

    Yes, I'll try :)

    You are correct, there is no code tag (which surprised me because so many of my zettel are about code). This is because I've created a new model Christian, a new map, a new way to view my notes. Its hard to explain, but here it is nevertheless:

    tag is to zettel as node is to kasten...

    I know hard to understand...

    Post edited by Mike_Sanders on
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