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Q&A #3 - Some tips on how to write good notes


Q&A #3 - Some tips on how to write good notes

Always think of your future self as if you encounter a different person than yourself.

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Comments

  • @sfast Good, short video - thank you.

    I had one thought while listening, which has to do with how I (and others on the forum) take notes. Say I am reading a book (paper or electronic). I keep iA Writer open on my iPad or computer and take fleeting notes as I read. I prefer doing this to highlight text. Within a day or so, I process those fleeting notes into my ZK. My thought is this - by making that intermediate step, I already move in the direction of making the Zettel independent of the context of the original idea, because when I create the Zettel, I am no longer looking at the book; I am working only from my fleeting notes. It's a small point, but it does seem to work for me. I also virtually eliminate the temptation to quote text from the book I am reading.

  • @GeoEng51 You are practicing what I first learned in philosophy and history: Making an excerpt. The excerpt is good when it is way shorter than the original text but contains all relevant ideas, arguments etc.

    I skip this step and go from text direct to notes in my Zettelkasten. However, depending on the difficulty of the text I do still create excerpts.

    Do you have to alter your notes before you put them in your ZK other than dividing the whole thing into separate files?

    I am a Zettler

  • @sfast said:
    @GeoEng51 You are practicing what I first learned in philosophy and history: Making an excerpt. The excerpt is good when it is way shorter than the original text but contains all relevant ideas, arguments etc.

    I skip this step and go from text direct to notes in my Zettelkasten. However, depending on the difficulty of the text I do still create excerpts.

    Do you have to alter your notes before you put them in your ZK other than dividing the whole thing into separate files?

    The following process applies when I am reading technical material that is new to me or fairly dense in terms of information content. There are times when I've gone directly from text to zettel, (or directly from thinking to zettel), but I prefer to use the intermediate step, as then I only have to worry about capturing ideas when writing the fleeting notes.

    So, the first step is to create the fleeting notes (or excerpt). You are correct that my fleeting notes are much shorter than the original. I may end up with a page or two of fleeting notes for 20 or 30 pages of text that I read - so the fleeting notes are quite a bit shorter than the original text. The fleeting notes do contain all of I what I consider to be the relevant ideas and essential informaiton.

    The second step is to process the fleeting notes into several zettels. There is some alteration that happens when I process my fleeting notes. For example, I find there is further compression, at least another 50% as I am trying to keep the zettels succinct (and sometimes even pithy). There is also re-organization, as people writing books often repeat themselves or express one idea in several different ways, in different places in their text. There could probably be even more compression, except that I am a bit wordy when I write - a result I think of trying to keep the zettel free of its original context.

  • By the way, in my original (October 17) post, I meant to say that I prefer taking fleeting notes to highlighting the original text (paper or electronic). My original post suggests that I take fleeting notes so that I can highlight them - this is not the case. I've moved almost entirely away from highlighting (the original text or my own notes), and just write the fleeting notes and then process them into zettels.

  • @GeoEng51 said:

    The following process applies when I am reading technical material that is new to me or fairly dense in terms of information content. There are times when I've gone directly from text to zettel, (or directly from thinking to zettel), but I prefer to use the intermediate step, as then I only have to worry about capturing ideas when writing the fleeting notes.

    So, the first step is to create the fleeting notes (or excerpt). You are correct that my fleeting notes are much shorter than the original. I may end up with a page or two of fleeting notes for 20 or 30 pages of text that I read - so the fleeting notes are quite a bit shorter than the original text. The fleeting notes do contain all of I what I consider to be the relevant ideas and essential informaiton.

    This is a challenge for me. I read a lot of literary and critical theory, which tends to be dense and complicated. My process tends to get bogged down in the first step. Perhaps 'bogged down' is the wrong metaphor, but I haven't yet found a way to speed up what is a laborious and time-consuming process as I try and accurately capture very complex arguments and examples. I hand-write literature notes (I guess I'm following Ahrens here who seems to me to conflate fleeting notes with literature notes) and making them shorter, succinct, or even pithy is a constant challenge.

    Started ZK 4.2018. "The path is at your feet, see? Now carry on."

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