Zettelkasten Forum


Making connections towards the beginning

Hey!

First post here!

I am newer to trying out note-taking within the set up the Archive and the Method as proposed on this website.

As I’m seeking to prioritize connections at the beginning, I’m seeing different opportunities. However, I’m finding it difficult in the prose. This makes establishing the connections difficult.

For example, today I was reading about deliberate practice and how immediate feedback is necessary within the practice session. I thought about how I can make a connection to other notes within the archive. I had another note about failure as a teacher that came from my readings on Toyota and their leadership practices. However, I didn’t know a good way to write out a good connection.

If it would help for me to post the contents of those notes in here I’d be happy to.

Any thoughts on how to do this naturally?

Comments

  • @rwrobinson said:
    However, I'm finding it difficult in the prose. This makes establishing the connections difficult.

    Maybe I didn't understand your question. Seeing the notes in question might help.

    For example, today I was reading about deliberate practice and how immediate feedback is necessary within a practice session. I thought about how I can make a connection to other notes within the archive. I had another note about failure as a teacher that came from my readings on Toyota and their leadership practices. However, I didn't know a good way to write out a good connection.
    Any thoughts on how to do this naturally?

    I am but a beginner. I wonder if you are asking how to physically notate links or how to develop a philosophy of linking.

    I'll try to explain how I do both.
    I've made some boilerplate of the two notes you mentioned in the images below. First, both notes at atomic? I usually link ideas by placing a link at the bottom of the note. I'll call this an idea to idea link. This would be in this position when the whole of the two ideas communicate. If I find that the communication is a shout demanding attention, I will move the link to the top of the note. I'll call this a super link. The third type of link is what I call an interstitial link. A link is placed mid-sentence to call attention to the exact relevant phrase. If this land between paragraphs, I place a full link with the title. In mid-sentence, I place a UUID link.

    My habit is to create a "Topic:" for each zettel. It helps with linking and forces me to rephrase the idea again and encapsulate it.

    Examples in the screenshots.

    Backlink if appropriate.

    Will Simpson
    “Read Poetry, Listen to Good Music, and Get Exercise”
    kestrelcreek.com

  • Thanks for your response!

    Let me go ahead and add the two notes below, and I think it might help to see.

    Note 1

    # 202203281339 Ericsson's Classification of Differentiated Practice
    #deliberate-practice
    
    There are three types of practice that Anders Ericsson proposes:
    - Naive Practice
    - Purposeful Practice
    - Deliberate Practice[223][#harwell100002021]
    
    Each type of practice increases in levels of difficulty and effectiveness in improving performance. Each type of practice assumes the other. That is, if you are doing Purposeful Practice, then you are doing, Naive Practice's requirements. The same with Deliberate and Purposeful. 
    
    Harwell and Southwick point out numerous features of practice that characterize the practice type.
    1. Doing the same activity repeatedly that is within the specific domain
    2. When you practice, you have a specific goal you are seeking to obtain
    3. Extreme concentration on the practice task
    4. Each practice session has immediate feedback
    5. The same task or similar tasks can be performed in a repetitious manner
    6. The practice has been designed specifically for the person practicing with incremental difficulty
    7. A Teacher/Coach is involved to establish the proper protocol for training and explicit instructions for how to improve best[223][#harwell100002021]
    
    Naive practice only includes feature one. Purposeful practice has features one through six. Deliberate practice has all seven features. The distinguishing feature of Deliberate practice from Purposeful practice is that you have a teacher/coach heavily involved in your practice. Which also assumes a domain that is well established in practice.[98][#ericssonPeakSecrets2016]
    
    ---
    ## Reference
    [#harwell100002021]: Harwell, Kyle, and Daniel Southwick. “Beyond 10,000 Hours: Addressing Misconceptions of the Expert Performance Approach.” *Journal of Expertise*, vol. 4, no. 2, June 2021, pp. 220–33.
    [#ericssonPeakSecrets2016]: Ericsson, Anders, and Robert Pool. Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise. Reprint edition, Eamon Dolan/Mariner Books, 2016.
    

    Note 2

    # 202203010633 Failure is a great teacher only if root causes are properly understood
    #problemsolving #failure #rootcauseanalysis
    
    > As the Toyota Way teaches, there is much to be learned from failures—but only if the true failures and their root causes are identified and understood.[XIV][#likerToyotaWayLean2011]
    
    Failure is a part of life. No person or organization succeeds at every task or initiative pursued. When failure happens, it is a great opportunity to learn what it was that held the person or organization from success. 
    
    However, a few things must be considered if learning is to occur:
    1. Time must be given to acknowledge the failure and how/why it occurred 
    2. There must be a context that failure was able to happen
    3. Identifying the root causes and understanding them well is absolutely necessary 
    4. One must not be afraid of failure
    
    Therefore, the skill of identifying the problem, and analyzing it's root causes is a very important to develop in an organization and life.
    
    ---
    ## Reference
    [#likerToyotaWayLean2011]: Liker, Jeffrey K., and Gary L. Convis. The Toyota Way to Lean Leadership: Achieving and Sustaining Excellence through Leadership Development. McGraw-Hill, 2011.
    

    For note 1, I'd not sure how I'd add in a link to note 2 in a way that fits well because it's related thematically, but it's not in the flow of what I was writing.

    Thanks!

  • @rwrobinson said:
    For note 1, I'd I'm not sure how I'd add in a link to note 2 in a way that fits well because it's related thematically, but it's not in the flow of what I was writing.

    By the way, welcome to the forums.

    Your two notes look well crafted. You've atomized the notes reflecting the ideas expressed. The titles of the notes summarize the content. What jumps out at me is the absence of links. A reason for that could be the number of relevant potential ideas in your ZK might be sparse.

    What happens when you search with the OMNIBAR #deliberate-practice OR #problemsolving OR #failure OR #rootcauseanalysis? Do you see any other notes that might be link candidates? How about deliberate OR practice OR problem OR solving OR failure OR "root cause analysis"?

    What part of "Ericsson's Classification of Differentiated Practice" do you feel is thematically related to "Failure is a great teacher only if root causes are properly understood"?

    I don't see any connectivity. One is about types of practice, and the other is about acknowledging the root cause of failure.

    Here I'm riffing on an idea. I might be all wet. One thin connection could be - inadequate practice can be considered a root cause of failure to perform. But neither note says this. Look at what you consider thematically related, and that is a new and novel idea that wasn't expressed in any of the reference materials. I'd create a new note expressing that idea and link these notes to it. Here is your opportunity to create a serendipitous note, a gift from the universe. You've let the notes work on you, and together you've made a nonobvious connection. Celebrate!

    Will Simpson
    “Read Poetry, Listen to Good Music, and Get Exercise”
    kestrelcreek.com

  • @Will , thanks again for the engagement and the warm welcome.

    I'll point out where I saw a connection.

    4. Each practice session has immediate feedback

    This made me think of failure being a great teacher. Obviously, each time you practice you won't fail, but you will often when you are trying to go beyond your current abilities, which is helping to form your mental representation/knowledge it would seem. It seems that Toyota's leadership has learned this from the perspective of managing their organization.

    But, adding [[202203010633]] after 4. Each practice session has immediate feedback would seem awkward. Also, it doesn't achieve was @sfast said:

    To make the most of a connection, always state explicitly why you made it. This is the link context. Introduction to the Zettelkasten Method

    I could maybe towards the end add on some commentary to this idea/connection, but it still seems like another part of the body of the note.


    Here I'm riffing on an idea. I might be all wet. One thin connection could be - inadequate practice can be considered a root cause of failure to perform. But neither note says this. Look at what you consider thematically related, and that is a new and novel idea that wasn't expressed in any of the reference materials. I'd create a new note expressing that idea and link these notes to it. Here is your opportunity to create a serendipitous note, a gift from the universe. You've let the notes work on you, and together you've made a nonobvious connection. Celebrate!

    I really like this too. Thanks for pointing it out!


    I'd love to hear your thoughts on anything here.

  • edited March 29

    @rwrobinson Each practice session has immediate feedback[[202203010633]] sounds good to me. The linked Zettel elaborates on the importance of immediate feedback in all practice sessions. Also, the text that comes before the link explains why you linked to the Zettel. Doing this is like adding wood to a campfire to make it burn stronger. However, I don't see a connection from [[202203010633]] to [[202203281339]]. Above all, bear in mind that where one person may see a connection, another one might not.

    Ah, and welcome to the club!

  • However, I don't see a connection from [[202203010633]] to [[202203281339]].

    Yeah. As thought/note, I agree. So, I wonder if it would be better to create a note for 4. Each practice session has immediate feedback and then write about the connection of feedback and learning via failure therein, connecting [[202203010633]].

    Ah, and welcome to the club!

    Thank you!

  • I'll share some random thoughts before specifics.

    • Maybe these notes want to be refactored
    • If you are thinking "4. Each…" leads to more ideas, then maybe the isn't atomized enough.
    • Bust ideas apart, distilling them to their atomic level. Allowing new fusions to occur.
    • I sense formality in your note format. Loosen up. Relax. Put your ideas in your ZK, no matter how messy.

    @rwrobinson said:
    I'll point out where I saw a connection.

    4. Each practice session has immediate feedback

    This made me think of failure being a great teacher. Obviously, each time you practice you won't fail, but you will often when you are trying to go beyond your current abilities, which is helping to form your mental representation/knowledge it would seem. It seems that Toyota's leadership has learned this from the perspective of managing their organization.

    The feeling of awkwardness should be a clue. Something is not quite right. I'd suggest a third note. Make a note containing your idea. (In bold above.) Now you have something that feels like a great connection. You have stated above exactly what the connection is and now you just have to record the idea into a note in order for the connection to feel satisfying.

    But, adding [[202203010633]] after 4. Each practice session has immediate feedback would seem awkward.

    Creating a third note, including your thoughts and ideas, will make the most of the connection.

    –––

    I'm still interested in what else might be in your ZK that could be connected.
    What notes are in the note list when you do the following two searches?
    #deliberate-practice OR #problemsolving OR #failure OR #rootcauseanalysis
    deliberate OR practice OR problem OR solving OR failure OR "root cause analysis"

    Will Simpson
    “Read Poetry, Listen to Good Music, and Get Exercise”
    kestrelcreek.com

  • I'm still interested in what else might be in your ZK that could be connected. What notes are in the note list when you do the following two searches?

    [[202203281339 Ericsson's Classification of Differentiated Practice]]
    [[202203262124 ∫ The Zettelkasten Method]]
    [[202202272024 Genchi Genbutsu]]
    [[202201231639 Research Questions about the Thinking Processes]]

    Seems like the most applicable would be from [[202203262124 ∫ The Zettelkasten Method]] where I wrote:

    Consistent effort and practice of the method is required for getting the benefits. The beginning user is likely to feel lacking in their ability at the beginning. However, after practice, they will begin to see the fruit of the method.

    Again, very early (77 total) in the note-making process.

  • The feeling of awkwardness should be a clue. Something is not quite right. I'd suggest a third note. Make a note containing your idea. (In bold above.) Now you have something that feels like a great connection.

    This is super helpful. Very simple, but it obviously wasn't obvious to me! :smile:

  • Here is what I came up with in a new note:

    # 202203291414 Quick Feedback as a Crucial Component of Both Individual and Organizational Learning for Improvement
    #feedback #learning #deliberate-practice
    
    When learning about the highest performing individuals or organizations, there is a consistent pattern of needing quick feedback that is carefully reviewed for understanding. 
    
    ## Toyota as an exemplar of an organization
    Toyota is one of the highest performing organizations in the world. They desire quick and properly understood feedback as a means of learning ([[202203010633]]).
    
    ## Purposeful and Deliberate Practice as exemplar of an individual
    Ericsson's classification of practice and the different characteristics of practice show us that one of the key factors for improvement is to quickly get feedback from a practice session ([[202203281339]]).
    
    ---
    ## References
    [#likerToyotaWayLean2011]: Liker, Jeffrey K., and Gary L. Convis. The Toyota Way to Lean Leadership: Achieving and Sustaining Excellence through Leadership Development. McGraw-Hill, 2011. 
    [#harwell100002021]: Harwell, Kyle, and Daniel Southwick. “Beyond 10,000 Hours: Addressing Misconceptions of the Expert Performance Approach.” *Journal of Expertise*, vol. 4, no. 2, June 2021, pp. 220–33.
    

    Open to feedback!

  • @Will said:
    I sense formality in your note format. Loosen up. Relax. Put your ideas in your ZK, no matter how messy.

    Glad to see that I'm not the only one writing messy Zettels. That's a bit of a relief. I thought that writing a statement followed by a list as a way to write an argument was lazy, but maybe it wasn't after all.


    @rwrobinson Let us know how you sorted things out in the end. I'd love to know how it went. :) The Critique My Zettel category could be useful for that. It doesn't seem to be "legal" to post a collection of interconnected Zettels in one post though. Perhaps there could be exceptions, @sfast?

  • It doesn't seem to be "legal" to post a collection of interconnected Zettels in one post though.

    Yeah. If I'm breaking a policy of some sort, please let me know.

    Critique my Zettel makes a lot of sense for my last post. Things kind of slowly progressed here though...

    Happy to do whatever.

  • @rwrobinson said:
    Here is what I came up with in a new note:

    Toyota as an exemplar of an organization

    Toyota is one of the highest performing organizations in the world. They desire quick and properly understood feedback as a means of learning ([[202203010633]]).
    ...

    You can lose the brackets surrounding the interstitial links. The links are not parenthetical - they are instrumental.

    [[202203281339 Ericsson's Classification of Differentiated Practice]]
    [[202203262124 ∫ The Zettelkasten Method]]
    [[202202272024 Genchi Genbutsu]]
    [[202201231639 Research Questions about the Thinking Processes]]

    Seems like the most applicable would be from [[202203262124 ∫ The Zettelkasten Method]]

    >

    Maybe [[202203262124 ∫ The Zettelkasten Method]] warrants a link but for sure [[202202272024 Genchi Genbutsu]] deserves a link to [[202203010633 Failure is a great teacher only if root causes are properly understood]]. This link pattern might lead you to link Genchi Genbutsu to Quick Feedback and Note 2 - [[202203010633 Failure is a great teacher only if root causes are properly understood]] which would create a nest of ideas connected for the future-you and might build into something sweet.

    Random thoughts.

    • There are only notes and structure notes which are a "collection of interconnected Zettels."
    • Tell us about your citation style in a new thread.
    • [[202201231639 Research Questions about the Thinking Processes]] brings into view a note that seems to an outsider to be of interest. How might Notes 1, 2, or 3 answer or add to the list of "Research Questions" I envision in the note? How might these ideas be connected? What terms where hits in the "Research Questions" note?

    Will Simpson
    “Read Poetry, Listen to Good Music, and Get Exercise”
    kestrelcreek.com

  • @rwrobinson

    Just to be clear, I didn't mean to force you to post there. It was only a suggestion. If you'd rather do it here, go for it. You're the captain of the ship.

    Speaking of which, if you happen to not understand something I said, don't hesitate to ask. Words may tangle up in my tongue from time to time.

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