Zettelkasten Forum


How do you handle confusion when reading for a Zettelkasten?

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Comments

  • edited October 2022

    @Will said:
    Here is a link to Rohan's thought-foozling RSS Feed.

    Our ability to drive a change in our behavior is directly proportional to our ability to check in with ourselves at a regular cadence.

    Regular check ins enable us to hit reset and course correct. They also give us the opportunity to recommit (as many times as necessary) to the why behind our commitment when the wheels inevitably fall off.

    Good quote; strikes a chord with me.

  • Chuckle, ZD you're all over the place here! Seriously though, critique that matrix as much as you feel compelled to, its no biggie & not the end of my world. I'd wager there are salient points you could make. But enough from me (I don't want to muck up Annabella's thread).

  • edited October 2022

    @Mike_Sanders said:
    Chuckle, ZD you're all over the place here! Seriously though, critique that matrix as much as you feel compelled to, its no biggie & not the end of my world. I'd wager there are salient points you could make. But enough from me (I don't want to muck up Annabella's thread).

    Bizarre. I don't know what you're talking about.

    Erdős #2. ZK software components. “If you’re thinking without writing, you only think you’re thinking.” -- Leslie Lamport. Replies sometimes delayed since life is short.

  • My bad ZD, the dialect of English I routinely speak here in the prairies of North America is mighty colloquial, for instance...

    (orange is how I'd 'say' it / purple, an attempt at explanation)...

    She's built hell for stout. / The truck is heavy duty & robust.

    I'll try to disambiguate each sentence of my last reply...

    Chuckle, ZD you're all over the place here!

    You've edited your last couple of replies to me just as I sought to reply to you, thus you've left me flummoxed (had to slip that one in for fun).

    Seriously though, critique that matrix as much as you feel compelled to, its no biggie & not the end of my world.

    Nothing is above skepticism, so if you chose to, any/all remarks about the decision matrix would be fair game as well.

    I'd wager there are salient points you could make.

    I can (or try to) learn from everybody.

    But enough from me (I don't want to muck up Annabella's thread).

    Doing that even now, though I was hoping to avoid it. No such luck it seems.

  • @Mike_Sanders Ah, we're talking past each other to some extent. I find Eisenhower matrices useful. They do presuppose that you know what is important, and that you are consistent. Some individuals are more prone to the hyperbolic discounting of the future, which leads to time-inconsistent preferences. Someone with an ADHD diagnosis would be more prone to this. Pointing out a presupposition of Eisenhower matrices is not a criticism of them or anyone who uses them. It's an observation relevant to knowing what you value.

    What about the revaluation of values? Brian Leiter, an authority on Nietzsche in the analytic tradition, argues that Nietzsche anticipated findings in 20th and 21st century psychology, and had greater insight than Hume about human nature. I referred to one such finding in Psychology Today, that re-evaluating and clarifying one's core values is more effective for enduring change than habit stacking or relying on willpower.

    I don't think nihilism has anything to do with this. Perhaps the mention of Nietzsche leads to this association--I didn't ask what you were getting at.

    Erdős #2. ZK software components. “If you’re thinking without writing, you only think you’re thinking.” -- Leslie Lamport. Replies sometimes delayed since life is short.

  • Sorry in a hurry, reply is brief.

    Re: Nietzsche/Nihilism

    I'm not sure the two can be decoupled in any meaningful way.

    Re: knowing what you value...

    This. Plant a flag here. I prefer the Hero template so rife in Western thought:

    Slay the dragon > earning the gold > winning the girl's heart

    Maybe toss in a triumphal arch elsewhere. Good enough for me I reckon.

  • @ZettelDistraction said:
    Fast-forward from Pythagoras to the prescient 19th-century philosopher Nietzsche. According to Brian Leiter, Nietzsche "repeatedly anticipates later developments in empirical psychology." For me, the empirical findings reported in the following article illustrate a psychological insight implicit in Nietzsche's "revaluation of values": https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-healthy-journey/202209/how-our-internal-values-shape-our-health

    I enjoyed reading this article - thanks for referencing it. While a bit light on evidence supporting his thesis, I nevertheless take it seriously, as it jives with my experience over the years. That doesn't make it "right", but it does resonate for me.

  • edited October 2022

    @GeoEng51 said:

    I enjoyed reading this article - thanks for referencing it. While a bit light on evidence supporting his thesis, I nevertheless take it seriously, as it jives with my experience over the years. That doesn't make it "right", but it does resonate for me.

    Apologies--when revisiting threads separated by days, it's sometimes hard to figure out the referents--which person does the pronoun "his" refer to?

    Erdős #2. ZK software components. “If you’re thinking without writing, you only think you’re thinking.” -- Leslie Lamport. Replies sometimes delayed since life is short.

  • @ZettelDistraction said:
    Apologies--when revisiting threads separated by days, it's sometimes hard to figure out the referents--which person does the pronoun "his" refer to?

    Yes, I was reaching back in the thread of the conversation a bit. I was talking about the article that you shared on "How Our Internal Values Shape Our Health" and the "his" referred to the author, Thomas Rutledge.

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